Korean Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 2017; 50(5): 391-394  https://doi.org/10.5090/kjtcs.2017.50.5.391
Intraoperative Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Monitoring in a Patient with Contralateral Vocal Fold Palsy
Bub-Se Na, M.D.1, Jin-Ho Choi, M.D.2, In Kyu Park, M.D., Ph.D.1, Young Tae Kim, M.D., Ph.D.1, Chang Hyun Kang, M.D., Ph.D.1
1Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 2Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital
Chang Hyun Kang
Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 03080, Korea
(Tel) 82-2-2072-3010 (Fax) 82-2-762-3566 (E-mail) chkang@snu.ac.kr
Received: December 12, 2016; Revised: March 4, 2017; Accepted: March 11, 2017.; Published online: October 5, 2017.
© The Korean Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. All rights reserved.

cc This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury can develop following cervical or thoracic surgery; however, few reports have described intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring. Consensus regarding the use of this technique during thoracic surgery is lacking. We used intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring in a patient with contralateral vocal cord paralysis who was scheduled for completion pneumonectomy. This case serves as an example of intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring during thoracic surgery and supports this indication for its use.
Keywords: Vocal cord paralysis, Intraoperative monitoring, Recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries


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